#23. Panopticon

#23. Panopticon
( 10 letters | 4 syllables)
( scrabble score – 16 points)

1 | noun | an area where everything is visible
2 | noun | a circular prison with cells distributed around a central surveillance station; proposed by Jeremy Bentham in 1791.
(Wolfram Alpha)
1. a round prison in which all cells are visible from the centre point
2. (archaic) an optical instrument enabling wide views of cities
3. (archaic) an exhibition room
(Collins Dictionary)

Origins:

Mid 18th century: from pan- ‘all’ + Greek optikon, neuter of optikos ‘optic’.
(Oxford Dictionary)

panopticon (n.) 
1768, a type of optical instrument or telescope, from Greek pan “all” (see pan-) + optikon, neuter of optikos “of or for sight” (see optic). Later the name of a type of prison designed by Bentham (1791) in which wardens had a constant view of all inmates, and “a showroom” (1850)
(Etymonline)

panopticon, architectural form for a prison, the drawings for which were published by Jeremy Bentham in 1791. It consisted of a circular, glass-roofed, tanklike structure with cells along the external wall facing toward a central rotunda; guards stationed in the rotunda could keep all the inmates in the surrounding cells under constant surveillance.

One Word Each Day Panopticon

Bentham’s Panopticon

   Although Bentham’s novel idea was not fully adopted in the plans for penal institutions built at that time, its radial plan was immediately influential, and its design clearly had an impact on later construction. For example, the Stateville Correctional Center, a prison near Joliet, Ill., U.S., incorporates essential features of the panopticon.(Brittanica )”Hence the major effect of the Panopticon: to induce in the inmate a state of conscious and permanent visibility that assures the automatic functioning of power.

 So to arrange things that the surveillance is permanent in its effects, even if it is discontinuous in its action; that the perfection of power should tend to render its actual exercise unnecessary; that this architectural apparatus should be a machine for creating and sustaining a power relation independent of the person who exercises it; in short, that the inmates should be caught up in a power situation of which they are themselves the bearers. To achieve this, it is at once too much and too little that the prisoner should be constantly observed by an inspector: too little, for what matters is that he knows himself to be observed; too much, because he has no need in fact of being so. 

In view of this, Bentham laid down the principle that power should be visible and unverifiable. Visible: the inmate will constantly have before his eyes the tall outline of the central tower from which he is spied upon. Unverifiable: the inmate must never know whether he is being looked at at any one moment; but he must be sure that he may always be so. In order to make the presence or absence of the inspector unverifiable, so that the prisoners, in their cells, cannot even see a shadow, Bentham envisaged not only venetian blinds on the windows of the central observation hall, but, on the inside, partitions that intersected the hall at right angles and, in order to pass from one quarter to the other, not doors but zig-zag openings; for the slightest noise, a gleam of light, a brightness in a half-opened door would betray the presence of the guardian. 

The Panopticon is a machine for dissociating the see/being seen dyad: in the peripheric ring, one is totally seen, without ever seeing; in the central tower, one sees everything without ever being seen.

excerpt from ‘Panopticism’ in Foucault, Michel: Discipline & Punish: The Birth of the Prison.
(Cryptome)

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